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Today: 22 August 2019, Thursday.

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News for Medicine & Human body





#1

 

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Description Fat-soluble statins can prevent liver cancer and reduce mortality in patients with chronic viral hepatitis. These are findings from a study conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, among others. The study is published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Chronic viral hepatit

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#2

 

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Description Over the course of 40 years, biologist Sharon Long has become an expert in symbiotic bacteria that help alfalfa grow. She has published over 150 papers on this one topic but when she realized her lab’s decades of highly focused research could contribute to a solution for citrus greening – a disease

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#3

 

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Description It’s well established that chronic inflammation can lead to colon cancer, but the molecular mechanisms behind this association aren’t fully understood. Research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center into the role that the signaling protein SMAD4 plays in this process has received funding from the

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#4

 

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Description Cytokines are a type of proteins that are important to the signaling between cells in the body's immune system, for example in the case of an infection or injury. A new study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Lund University, is now indica

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#5

 

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Description Vitamin D deficiency in middle childhood could result in aggressive behavior as well as anxious and depressive moods during adolescence, according to a new University of Michigan study of school children in Bogotá, Colombia. Children with blood vitamin D levels suggestive of deficiency were almos

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#6

 

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Description As you age your blood pressure is likely to change. That is a normal part of life, which is predictable and can be easily addressed with our current medication. Blood pressure is not to be taken lightly, because it is a major indicator of cardiovascular health. Now a UCL-led research found that prem

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#7

 

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Description Depression can be associated with behaviours such as social avoidance, that is, the refusal to interact with others for fear of being judged or criticized. Physicians and other mental health workers have noted that patients with depressive disorders exhibit cognitive symptoms, especially with regard

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#8

 

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Description Breathing polluted air is bad for us in ways that go well beyond lung disease.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#9

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#10

 

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Description FireEye said on Thursday that hackers broke into a leading India-based healthcare website, stealing 68 lakh records containing patient and doctor information.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#11

 

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Description Epithelial cancers, such as cancers of the lung and pancreas, use the ανβ3 molecule to gain drug resistance to standard cancer therapies and to become highly metastatic. In a paper published in Cancer Research, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified a new therap

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#12

 

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Description A University of Virginia School of Medicine scientist has, for the first time, identified key immunological changes in people who abruptly develop an allergic reaction to mammalian meat, such as beef. His work also provides an important framework for other scientists to probe this strange, recently

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#13

 

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Description MIT biologists have discovered an unexpected effect of a ketogenic, or fat-rich, diet: They showed that high levels of ketone bodies, molecules produced by the breakdown of fat, help the intestine to maintain a large pool of adult stem cells, which are crucial for keeping the intestinal lining healt

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#14

 

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Description Using a technique that can precisely edit DNA bases, MIT researchers have created a way to store complex “memories” in the DNA of living cells, including human cells. The new system, known as DOMINO, can be used to record the intensity, duration, sequence, and timing of many events in the life of

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#15

 

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Description Researchers have found a way to distinguish four distinct classes of cells from electrical spiking information.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#16

 

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Description MIT researchers have found that high levels of ketone bodies, molecules produced by the breakdown of fat, help the intestine to maintain a functional stem cell pool, which are crucial for intestinal regeneration.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#17

 

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Description MIT researchers have created a technology called DOMINO to store complex “memories” in the DNA of living cells, including human cells. This memory storage capacity can form the foundation of complex circuits that trigger a cellular event, such as producing a fluorescent protein, when a specific event or sequence of events occurs.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#18

 

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Description New study suggests there were 5707 cases on the island, though only 187 were reported

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#19

 

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Description General Electric has recently been accused of accounting fraud for not properly reporting the cost of providing Long Term Care to old people on insurance policies sold many years ago....

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#20

 

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Description Despite a 60% rise in cases in five days, officials still haven't determined a cause.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#21

 

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Description By creating a microdevice that mimics lung function on single-cell levels, researchers at Rutgers, Yale, and Johns Hopkins have learned more about asthmatic trigger response, leading to better treatment. Researchers at Rutgers and other institutions have discovered how muscle contraction (bronchospasm) in the airway, which cause breathing difficulty in people with asthma, occur by creating a microdevice that mimics the behavior of the human airways. The study, published in the July 2019 issue of the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering and previously online, could lead to new treatment strategies for respiratory diseases, said co-author Reynold Panettieri, director of the Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science. Bronchospasm can occur in both healthy people and those who suffer from serious respiratory diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Studying why the smooth muscle surrounding bronchial airways can suddenly contract and lead to difficulties in breathing is difficult due to the complexities of bronchospasm and the fact that the human respiratory system cannot be modeled in animal studies. To analyze the biochemical and mechanical signals that occur between cells during spasms, the researchers created a microdevice — a “bronchi on a chip” one-thousandth the size of a human hair — containing cells from healthy and asthmatic lungs that mimics the function of a lung on single-cell levels. When they triggered a simulated bronchospasm on the device, the researchers discovered that the initial contraction prompts the secretion of hormone-like compounds that either can induce an additional constriction or relax the spasm. In people with asthma, the smooth muscle surrounding the airways is more reactive and contracts more easily in response to stimuli such as allergens, leading to extended bronchial spasms, wheezing and shortness of breath. They also found that inducing a second asthmatic trigger during a bronchial spasm at a precise time will actually cause the smooth muscle to relax and stop the spasm. The treatments for bronchospasm have not changed in the past 50 years, Panettieri said, since they work for most — but not all — people. “The microdevice allowed us to drill down into how single cells interact with each other in relation to smooth muscle contraction in a variety of lung diseases,” said Panettieri. “Being able to study the mechanics on the single-cell level and view thousands of cells simultaneously can be an important screening tool for the development of new drugs for people with asthma who don’t respond to current treatment.” ### The study was led by Steven An, director of Bioengineering at Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science and professor of pharmacology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and researchers at the Yale University’s Yale Systems Biology Institute and Johns Hopkins University. Paper: “A microphysiological model of the bronchial airways reveals the interplay of mechanical and biochemical signals in bronchospasm,” was published in the July 2019 issue of the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering. DOI:10.1038/s41551-019-0366-7

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#22

 

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Description Cannabidiol (CBD) oils and products have become increasingly popular with consumers as ways to find relief from aches and pains, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and other chronic issues. But are these products safe, and are they helpful? A review of the latest research, to be published in September in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, finds there’s a growing body of preclinical and clinical evidence to suggest that CBD oils may hold promise for treating conditions such as chronic pain and opioid addiction. But few clinical studies on the safety and efficacy of CBD have been reported, and more research involving humans is needed before health care providers can say definitely that they’re helpful and safe, according to Mayo Clinic researchers. “There are many intriguing findings in pre-clinical studies that suggest CBD and hemp oil have anti-inflammatory effects and may be helpful with improving sleep and anxiety,” says Brent Bauer, M.D., an internist and director of research for the Mayo Clinic Integrative Medicine program. “But trials in humans are still limited, so it is too early to be definitive about efficacy and safety.” Dr. Bauer says there’s reason for concern about a growing number of reports of liver injury in patients who have used CBD products. With greatly increasing patient interest in CBD and hemp oil products, it’s important that clinical research moves ahead to better understand their potential value and safety, he says. “Careful selection of a health care product is crucial, and though these products do not have Food and Drug Administration approval for therapeutic use, patients continue to ask for them and use them. Physicians need to become better informed about these products, and it’s important that human trials examine issues of efficacy and safety.”

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#23

 

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Description A US-based cyber security firm said cyber criminals -- mostly China-based -- are directly selling data stolen from healthcare organisations and web portals globally including in India in the underground markets.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 22 August 2019

#24

 

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Description Using a special emulsion process, water is added to oil. When the water-to-oil ratio is 4 to 1, the oil spheres begin to deform and pack tightly against one another, resulting in a product that behaves like butter. Credit: Jason Koski, Cornell University Cornell University food scientists have created a new low-calorie ‘butter’ spread that consists mostly of water. A tablespoon of this low-calorie spread has 2.8 grams of fat and 25.2 calories. Butter, on the other hand, which is 84% fat and about 16% water, has about 11 grams of fat and nearly 100 calories. They figured out a new process to emulsify a large amount of water with minuscule drops of vegetable oil and milk fat to mimic butter, at approximately one-fourth the calories of real butter and without artificial stabilizers. “Imagine 80% water in 20% oil and we create something with the consistency of butter, with the mouthfeel of butter and creaminess of butter,” said food science professor and senior author Alireza Abbaspourrad. Emulsifying water and oil is nothing new, said Abbaspourrad, but by using high-internal phase emulsions (HIPE), “we keep adding water to that oil until the final composition is 80% water and 20% oil.”

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#25

 

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Description A firm hired by the National Institutes of Health will work with participants in a research programme that plans to sequence one million genomes.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#26

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#27

 

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Description Whether cell types in the brain have been conserved during evolution is not clear. A comparison of the molecular recipes that define brain cell types in humans and mice reveals similarities and differences between species.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#28

 

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Description Health ministry aids animal rights group

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#29

 

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Description Immune cells called monocytes enter the lung during infection. Whether they help to launch a defence response is affected by the pressure encountered there, which is sensed by an ion channel called PIEZO1.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#30

 

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Description Watch World’s First MRI of SINGLE Atom Is Here, It Could Revolutionize Imaging, a Tech video from Seeker.

#Medicine & Human body;#Aging
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#31

 

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Description Dry soil makes hotter weather, but so does dry soil way upwind.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#32

 

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Description THE world’s funniest fart sounds messy, lasts four seconds and is embarrassing, scientists say. They studied 176 types — ranging from the “common quack” and “cheeky squeaker” to the show-stopping “thunder blunder”.

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Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#33

 

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Description A DEAD cat has reportedly been cloned and reborn in China – and the company that did it wants to clone your pets too. Cloned kitten "Garlic" born on July 21 in Beijing, and is believed to be the first cat successfully cloned in the country, according to reports.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#34

 

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Description People who have high blood pressure in their 40s seem to have smaller brains by the time they are 70. The findings provide more evidence that looking after your health can help prevent dementia, says Jonathan Schott at University College London, who led the study. Around 30 per cent of dementia cases are thought to be preventable, says Schott. To find out how important blood pressure might be, his team turned to a group of individuals who have been part of a research project since they were born in 1946. The volunteers had their blood pressure measured in their 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s. In the latest study, Schott’s team took brain scans and assessed the cognition of 502 members of the group, who were by that time aged between 69 and 71. The team found that people who had a higher diastolic blood pressure aged 43 were more likely to have smaller brains by the time they were around 70. A brain region vital for memory, called the hippocampus, seemed especially affected – individuals with a greater increase in systolic blood pressure between the ages of 36 and 43 had smaller hippocampi around 70. “It looks like one’s blood pressure is influencing one’s brain health 40 years later,” says Schott. Because the results only show a correlation, the team can’t say for sure that high blood pressure was responsible for brain shrinkage. But we do know that high blood pressure is bad for the brain, and can lead to blood vessel damage. Without a healthy blood supply, brain tissue can die. Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2213955-high-blood-pressure-in-your-40s-linked-to-smaller-brain-size-at-70/#ixzz5xJR8vQjq

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#35

 

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Description Three years after the measles virus was eliminated from the UK, the country has lost its “measles-free” status with the World Health Organization, following 231 confirmed cases of the infection in the first quarter of 2019. The Prime Minister Boris Johnson has called for health leaders to renew their efforts to ensure 95 per cent of the population have had two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Current data suggests only 87.2 per cent of children receive the second dose of the vaccine, down from a high of 88.6 per cent during the 2014 to 2015 period. “Measles is one of the most infectious diseases known to man – only one person travelling back to an area with lower vaccination rates can lead to an outbreak,” says Mary Ramsay, of the government agency Public Health England. “Anyone who has not received two doses of MMR vaccine is always at risk.” To improve vaccination rates, NHS England will write to all GPs urging them to promote “catch-up” vaccination programmes. The body will also look at strengthening the role of local immunisation co-ordinators, in a bid to improve uptake of the vaccine. Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2213764-the-uk-has-lost-its-world-health-organization-measles-free-status/#ixzz5xJPsCEYy

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#36

 

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Description What you need to know about this ongoing investigation.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#37

 

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Description <em>Matador</em> seems like a straightforward thriller at first, but it cleverly deconstructs the component parts of the everyday and seeds a wealth of hints in its panels.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#38

 

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Description To date, the underlying causes of inflammation in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been poorly understood, which has hampered efforts to develop treatments to prevent complications from a disease that is the third leading cause of death in the United States. But new research at the University of Kentucky shows that changes to mitochondria–the powerhouse of cells–drive chronic inflammation from cells exposed to certain types of fats, shattering the prevailing assumption that glucose was the culprit. Chronic inflammation fuels many of the devastating complications of type 2 diabetes, including cardiovascular, kidney, and periodontal diseases, and is thus one of the key targets for therapy development. This new data may enlighten the conversation about tight glycemic control as the dominant treatment goal for people with diabetes. The research was recently published in Cell Metabolism by a team led by Barbara Nikolajczyk (UK Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center, Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences) and Douglas Lauffenberger (MIT Department of Biological Engineering). Nikolajczyk and Lauffenberger didn’t set out to disprove the glucose-inflammation causation theory. Based on the importance of glycolysis–a 10-reaction sequence that produces energy–in other types of inflammation, the team hypothesized that immune cells from patients with type 2 diabetes would produce energy by burning glucose. “We were wrong,” Nikolajczyk said. “We exclusively used immune cells from human subjects for all of the work, ” Nikolajczyk explained, noting that humans, but not animal models of type 2 diabetes, have the specific pro-inflammatory T cell profile her team had identified in earlier research. The team was surprised to find that glycolysis wasn’t driving chronic inflammation. Instead, a combination of defects in mitochondria and elevated fat derivatives were responsible. Nikolajczyk said she sees applications for this research in both basic and clinical sciences. She hopes to precisely define pro-inflammatory lipid types and explore associations between circulating and/or tissue-associated lipids and insulin resistance, one key feature of Type 2 diabetes. She is also interested in contributing to the development of new analytical approaches, spearheaded by Dr. Lauffenburger’s team, that leverage ongoing lipid-related findings into a new understanding of pathology in type 2 diabetes. “Aggressive blood glucose control to lower the risk of diabetic complications has been the goal for most people with Type 2 Diabetes for decades,” Nikolajczyk said. “Our data provide an explanation for why people with tight glucose control can nonetheless have disease progression.”

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#39

 

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Description Voters may form false memories after seeing fabricated news stories, especially if those stories align with their political beliefs, according to research in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research was conducted in the week preceding the 2018 referendum on legalizing abortion in Ireland, but the researchers suggest that fake news is likely to have similar effects in other political contexts, including the U.S. presidential race in 2020. “In highly emotional, partisan political contests, such as the 2020 US Presidential election, voters may ‘remember’ entirely fabricated news stories,” says lead author Gillian Murphy of University College Cork. “In particular, they are likely to ‘remember’ scandals that reflect poorly on the opposing candidate.’ The study is novel because it examines misinformation and false memories in relation to a real-world referendum, Murphy explains. She and her colleagues, including leading memory researcher Elizabeth Loftus of the University of California, Irvine, recruited 3,140 eligible voters online and asked them whether and how they planned to vote in the referendum. Next, the experimenters presented each participant with six news reports, two of which were made-up stories that depicted campaigners on either side of the issue engaging in illegal or inflammatory behavior. After reading each story, participants were asked if they had heard about the event depicted in the story previously; if so, they reported whether they had specific memories about it. The researchers then informed the eligible voters that some of the stories they read had been fabricated, and invited the participants to identify any of the reports they believed to be fake. Finally, the participants completed a cognitive test. Nearly half of the respondents reported a memory for at least one of the made-up events; many of them recalled rich details about a fabricated news story. The individuals in favor of legalizing abortion were more likely to remember a falsehood about the referendum opponents; those against legalization were more likely to remember a falsehood about the proponents. Many participants failed to reconsider their memory even after learning that some of the information could be fictitious. And several participants recounted details that the false news reports did not include. “This demonstrates the ease with which we can plant these entirely fabricated memories, despite this voter suspicion and even despite an explicit warning that they may have been shown fake news,” Murphy says. Participants who scored lower on the cognitive test were no more prone to forming false memories than were higher scorers, but low scorers were more likely to remember false stories that aligned with their opinions. This finding suggests that people with higher cognitive ability may be more likely to question their personal biases and their news sources, the researchers say. Other collaborators on the project include Rebecca Hofstein Grady and Linda J. Levine at UC Irvine and Ciara Greene of University College Dublin. The researchers say they plan to expand on this study by investigating the influence of false memories related to the Brexit referendum and the “#MeToo movement.” Loftus says understanding the psychological effects of fake news is critical given that sophisticated technology is making it easier to create not only phony news reports and images, but fake video, as well. “People will act on their fake memories, and it is often hard to convince them that fake news is fake,” Loftus says. “With the growing ability to make news incredibly convincing, how are we going to help people avoid being misled? It’s a problem that psychological scientists may be uniquely qualified to work on.”

#Medicine & Human body;#Psychology
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#40

 

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Description The spread has almost one-fourth of the fat and calories of real butter, but looks and feels like the real thing.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#41

 

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Description When sparks fly to innovate new technologies for imaging life at the microscopic scale, often diverse researchers are nudging each other with a kind of collegial one-upmanship. “Look at the resolution we obtain with this microscope I’ve designed,” the physicist says. “Great,” the biologist replies, “but my research organism moves fast. Can you boost the system’s speed?” “You’ll have terabytes of raw data coming off that microscope system,” says the computational scientist. “We’ll build in algorithms to manage the data and produce the most meaningful images.” Around they go, propelling a cycle of challenge and innovation that allows them to see more clearly into new dimensions of the microscopic world. Interdisciplinary interactions are essential for driving the innovation pipeline in biological imaging, yet collegial workspaces where they can spring up and mature are lacking in the United States. Last fall, the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) convened a National Science Foundation workshop to identify the bottlenecks that stymie innovation in microscopy and imaging, and recommend approaches for transforming how imaging technologies are developed and deployed. The conclusions of the 79 workshop participants are summarized in a Commentary in the August issue of Nature Methods.

#Medicine & Human body;#Aging
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#42

 

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Description FOR decades, health experts have been lecturing us about our bad habits, blaming them for the surge in “lifestyle diseases”. These often come on as we age and include heart disease, Alzheimer’s, type 2 diabetes and some cancers. Worldwide, 70 per cent of all deaths are now attributed to these conditions. In the UK, it is a whopping 90 per cent. Too much red meat, too little fruit and veg, smoking, drinking, obesity and not enough exercise appear to make all these diseases more likely – and having any of them makes getting the others more likely. But no one really knows why, and we still haven’t worked out what causes any of them. Alzheimer’s is now one of the UK’s biggest killers, yet the main hypothesis for how it originates imploded this year after drugs based on it repeatedly failed. High blood cholesterol is blamed for heart attacks, except most people who have heart attacks don’t have it. Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg24332420-900-have-we-found-the-true-cause-of-diabetes-stroke-and-alzheimers/#ixzz5xJCU5vvl

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#43

 

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Description It’s whiffy, it’s unpleasant, and many of us have suffered from the embarrassment it causes, but what is the best way to deal with body odour?

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#44

 

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Description Health Nucleus offers a personalized health assessment that integrates imaging and genomics to generate a more complete picture of your current state of health and future risks....

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#45

 

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Description Health Nucleus offers a personalized health assessment that integrates imaging and genomics to generate a more complete picture of your current state of health and future risks....

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#46

 

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Description Daniel Kraft is a Stanford and Harvard trained physician-scientist, inventor and innovator. With over 25 years of experience in clinical practice, biomedical research and healthcare innovation, Kraft has served as Faculty Chair for Medicine & Neuroscience at Singularity University since SU’s inception, and founded and is chair of Exponential Medicine, a program that explores convergent, rapidly developing technologies and their potential in biomedicine and healthcare....

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#47

 

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Description Unions representing Ryanair cabin crew in Spain warned on Tuesday of a 10-day strike in September to protest against the anticipated closing of some airport bases for the low-cast Irish airline.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#48

 

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Description Tiny, nanoscale glass bottles triggered by heat could be used to deliver drugs to specific locations in the body.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#49

 

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Description An international team of biologists has found that homologs of genes involved in hair and feather formation in other vertebrates are responsible for pufferfish spine development.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#50

 

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Description The University of Washington School of Medicine and VA Puget Sound Health Care System today announced a two-year partnership to develop new uses of 3D printing to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of complex heart conditions. The collaboration is expected to help cardiologists better visualize the

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#51

 

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Description Koala bears are a symbol of Australian wildlife. In 2013 koala population grew rapidly, which is nice, but scientists noticed a worrying trend - food resources of these iconic marsupials diminished rather quickly. This lead to 70 % mortality due to starvation, which was a shocking catastrophe. Now A

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#52

 

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Description One of nature’s most familiar phenomena is collective behavior—fish swimming in schools, locusts marching together, birds flocking. The same thing happens in humans, with individual cells synchronizing into circadian rhythms, part of a biological clock that tells our bodies when to eat, sleep or rep

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#53

 

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Description Transgender men who become pregnant are at increased risk for depression and difficulty getting medical care due to a lack of knowledge among health care providers, a Rutgers study reports. The study, published in the journal Maturitas, examined health care research on transgender men who become

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#54

 

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Description Hookah waterpipe use has grown in popularity in recent years – 1 in 5 college students in the U.S. and Europe have tried it – but the practice could be more dangerous than other forms of smoking, according to a first-of-its-kind study by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, published

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#55

 

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Description A recent report by the New Jersey Poison Control Center at Rutgers University showed a rise in suicide attempts by pre-teens over the past 18 months —  a trend that has been seen across the nation. “This illustrates the need for people who encounter children regularly to be aware of early signs o

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#56

 

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Description Retiring from your full-time job might not be the best thing for your brain as you age, according to a new study out of Florida State University. A team of researchers led by FSU Associate Professor of Sociology Dawn Carr found that people in so-called low-cognitive-complexity jobs, such as truck

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#57

 

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Description A lightweight hip-worn exosuit pares the technology down to the essentials to provide assistance during walking or running.

#Medicine & Human body;#Hardware & Devices
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 21 August 2019

#58

 

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Description The UK is “on the cusp of a huge health tech revolution that could transform patient experience”, said health minister Matt Hancock when he announced £250 million to fund a new AI Lab for the National Health Service earlier this month. The lab has been set up to bring together academics and technology companies to work on some of the biggest challenges in health and care. But the AI sector has a reputation for overpromising on what it can deliver – as do politicians. I met with Indra … Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2214009-an-inside-look-at-the-nhss-plans-to-revolutionise-healthcare-with-ai/#ixzz5xDeI2fwm

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#59

 

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Description Yet another intriguing example of scientists and doctors finding or rediscovering therapeutic uses for psychedelic drugs.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#60

 

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Description Magnetic particles allow drugs to be released at precise times and in specific areas. Most pharmaceuticals must either be ingested or injected into the body to do their work. Either way, it takes some time for them to reach their intended targets, and they also tend to spread out to other areas of the body. Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a system to deliver medical treatments that can be released at precise times, minimally-invasively, and that ultimately could also deliver those drugs to specifically targeted areas such as a specific group of neurons in the brain. The new approach is based on the use of tiny magnetic particles enclosed within a tiny hollow bubble of lipids (fatty molecules) filled with water, known as a liposome. The drug of choice is encapsulated within these bubbles, and can be released by applying a magnetic field to heat up the particles, allowing the drug to escape from the liposome and into the surrounding tissue. The findings are reported today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology in a paper by MIT postdoc Siyuan Rao, Associate Professor Polina Anikeeva, and 14 others at MIT, Stanford University, Harvard University, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. “We wanted a system that could deliver a drug with temporal precision, and could eventually target a particular location,” Anikeeva explains. “And if we don’t want it to be invasive, we need to find a non-invasive way to trigger the release.” Magnetic fields, which can easily penetrate through the body — as demonstrated by detailed internal images produced by magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI — were a natural choice. The hard part was finding materials that could be triggered to heat up by using a very weak magnetic field (about one-hundredth the strength of that used for MRI), in order to prevent damage to the drug or surrounding tissues, Rao says.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#61

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#62

 

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Name
Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#63

 

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Name
Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#64

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#65

 

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Description Their burrows are being treated with insecticide to kill the fleas that spread the disease.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#66

 

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Description In an earlier study, the IIT Madras team had found that colorectal cancer cells died under simulated microgravity but once the microgravity condition was removed, they resurrected.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#67

 

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Description State and federal health officials are investigating dozens of cases of mystery lung illnesses related to vaping in young people across the country. The states include California, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#68

 

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Description Irvine, Calif. -- A University of California, Irvine-led study has found that online brain game exercises can enable people in their 70s and even 80s to multitask cognitively as well as individuals 50 years their junior. This is an increasingly valuable skill, given today's daily information onslaught, which can divide attention and be particularly taxing for older adults. "The brain is not a muscle, but like our bodies, if we work out and train it, we can improve our mental performance," said lead author Mark Steyvers, a UCI professor of cognitive sciences. "We discovered that people in the upper age ranges who completed specific training tasks were able to beef up their brain's ability to switch between tasks in the game at a level similar to untrained 20- and 30-year-olds." The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, underscore the cognitive cost of multitasking, which dilutes function by splitting focus, as well as the ways in which people across the lifespan can overcome the brain drain brought on by both the increasingly cluttered multimedia environment and the natural aging process. For the study, Steyvers and his colleagues partnered with Lumosity, an online platform that offers a variety of daily brain training games. They focused on data from "Ebb and Flow" - a task-switching game that challenges the brain's ability to shift between cognitive processes interpreting shapes and movement. Of the millions of people who played the game between 2012 and 2017, researchers randomly sampled the performance of about 1,000 users within two categories: those who ranged in age from 21 to 80 and had completed fewer than 60 training sessions; and adults 71 to 80 who had logged at least 1,000 sessions. They found that the majority of older and highly practiced players were able to match or exceed the performance of younger users who had not played very much. Any lead seniors had, though, significantly declined after the 21- to 30-year-olds had completed more than 10 practice sessions. "Medical advances and improved lifestyles are allowing us to live longer," Steyvers said. "It's important to factor brain health into that equation. We show that with consistent upkeep, cognitive youth can be retained well into our golden years."

#Medicine & Human body;#Aging
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#69

 

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Description Engineers at Caltech have launched a new research initiative aimed at restoring natural and stable locomotion to individuals with walking deficiencies that result from spinal cord injuries and strokes.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#70

 

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Description A research team in Japan has demonstrated that electrochemical reactions can spontaneously occur in or near hydrothermal vent environments to generate the building blocks of life.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#71

 

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Description A Stanford neuroscientist tries to identify depression subtypes and tailor care

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#72

 

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Description Purdue Pharma will share drug candidates and blood samples with Oklahoma State University, the beneficiary of a previous legal settlement

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#73

 

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Name
Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#74

 

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Name
Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#75

 

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Description Beachgoers are becoming increasingly aware of the potentially harmful effects UV filters from sunscreens can have on coral and other marine organisms when the protective lotions wash off their bodies into the ocean. Now, researchers have studied how sunscreens release different compounds — trace

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#76

 

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Description Studies have shown that male victims of domestic violence are at greater risk of growing up to be perpetrators themselves. New research, done in collaboration with Case Western Reserve University, suggests potential pathways of how that devastating cycle might be broken. “To better understand int

#Medicine & Human body;#Psychology
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#77

 

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Description The molecular mechanism used by many bacteria to kill neighboring cells has redundancy built into its genetic makeup, which could allow for the mechanism to be expressed in different environments. Some strains of luminescent bacteria that compete to colonize the light organs of the Hawaiian bobtail

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#78

 

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Description Experts from the University of Alberta and two universities of California are teaming up to launch the world’s first open-source database for spinal cord injury research. The Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI) will improve research and treatment worldwide by m

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#79

 

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Name
Description Most pharmaceuticals must either be ingested or injected into the body to do their work. Either way, it takes some time for them to reach their intended targets, and they also tend to spread out to other areas of the body. Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a system to deliver medi

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 20 August 2019

#80

 

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Name
Description Genetic studies rebut current warnings from health officials that alcohol causes breast tumours, and that even light drinking causes throat cancer

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#81

 

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Description The Marketing Mix, also referred to as the 4P’s of Marketing, has been a staple for business leaders over the…...

#Medicine & Human body;#Aging
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#82

 

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Description Nearly 1 year after cannabis legalization, Canadian scientists bemoan long waits for research licenses

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#83

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#84

 

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Name
Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#85

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#86

 

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Description (Hoboken, N.J. – Aug. 7, 2019) – The thump, thump of a baby’s heartbeat is a milestone in any pregnancy. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a technique that could allow expectant parents to hear their baby’s heartbeat continuously at home with a non-invasive and safe device that is potentially more accurate than any fetal heartrate monitor currently available in the market. The device, which uses the same commercial sensors used in smartphones to horizontally or vertically orient the device, can record vibrations sent through a mother’s abdomen when her baby’s heart beats or when the fetus squirms and kicks. Lauded by physicians, the device could potentially reduce an estimated 2.6 million stillbirths per year worldwide. “Almost a third of stillbirths occur in the absence of complicating factors,” said Negar Tavassolian, an associate professor who led the work at Stevens. “Our device could let a pregnant woman know if her fetus is compromised and she needs to go to the doctor.” Many stillbirths are preceded by variations in fetal movement and heartrate, so affordable, lightweight monitors that detect vibrations generated from a heartbeat could be worn continuously in the final weeks of pregnancy to ensure that distressed fetuses receive prompt medical attention. The work is reported in the July 24 early access issue of IEEE Sensors Journal. Tavassolian and first author Chenxi Yang, a graduate student at Stevens, teamed up with Bruce Young and Clarel Antoine, two OB-GYNs at New York University-Langone Medical Center to test their sensors. In experiments on 10 pregnant women, they found the device could detect fetal heartrate with about the same accuracy as fetal cardiotocograms (f-CTG), which measures the baby’s heart electrical activity (ECG) together with mother’s uterine contractions -- and considered the current standard for fetal monitoring. A vibration monitor offers important advantages over existing tools based on ECG or Doppler ultrasound technology, which require specialized knowledge to use, and can be bulky and expensive. One leading monitor system currently on the market weighs more than 11 pounds and has a battery life of four hours; by contrast, the Stevens team’s sensors are barely a fifth-of-an-inch long, weigh next to nothing, and can run off a 3-volt battery for more than 24 hours. Yang’s previous work has shown that chest vibrations could be used to track an adult’s heartbeat, but measuring the fetal heartbeat is an order of magnitude more difficult, with the faint vibrations of the fetus’s tiny heart muffled by the movements of the maternal host. To solve that problem, the Stevens team combined signals from three different sensors, and used algorithms to isolate the fetal heartbeat. The new monitor also poses no risk to the fetus — a concern with ultrasound monitors, which can heat tissue if used continuously for long periods. The Stevens team’s monitor simply detects existing vibrations, like a doctor listening with a stethoscope. “Our monitors are completely passive, so there’s no health concern,” Tavassolian said. Vibration monitors can also offer an objective measure of fetal movement, which is currently assessed simply by asking moms to count the times their baby kicks. Combining heart-rate and movement data could provide vital insights into fetal health, surpassing anything that’s currently available, Yang explained. “That’s the big plan — to fuse these different modalities into a single device,” he said. The current device uses commercially available sensors, but the long-term goal is to patent and market a custom-built device. Costing far less than equivalent ECG or ultrasound systems, such a device could capture a significant share of the global market for fetal monitors, which is expected to reach $3.6 billion by 2022.

#Medicine & Human body;#Hardware & Devices
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#87

 

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Description The Singapore National Eye Centre and the Singapore Eye Research Institute plan to reduce the prevalence of myopia in Singapore through education and awareness initiatives.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#88

 

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Description For a guy who studies other people's stress for a living, Robert-Paul Juster certainly seems to handle it well himself. The Université de Montréal neuroscientist is busy on many fronts, researching stress among the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community, stress in the workplace,

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#89

 

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Description Studies have shown that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children can be reduced through positive parenting: by encouraging them, reassuring them, structuring their tasks and, of course, giving affection. But few studies have measured the effect of positive parenting when combin

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#90

 

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Description Patients with Lyme disease in England and Wales hospitals appear to be predominantly white, female and living in areas of low deprivation, according to a new study by the University of Liverpool and Public Health England. The study, which examined data on 2,361 hospital patients collected between

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#91

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#92

 

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Name
Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#93

 

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Name
Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#94

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#95

 

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Description According to researchers from Imperial College London, the party drug MDMA could be an effective treatment for alcohol addiction.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#96

 

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Description Even low-intensity exercise, such as walking four or more hours a week, was associated with a nearly 20% reduction in cancer progression or death over the

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#97

 

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Description If you still use Facebook after the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Libra, and more privacy and ethics violations than you and ...

#Hardware & Devices;#Medicine & Human body;#Privacy
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#98

 

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Description Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a new lipid-based system that can deliver drugs inside the body with pinpoint timing using magnetic particles.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#99

 

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Description Artificial limbs made out of plastic water bottles could save healthcare providers millions of pounds and help tackle pollution at the same time.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#100

 

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Description In one case, a patient linked his disease to suspect THC oil he bought on the street.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#101

 

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Description Combining the data-analysis tool Starfish with technologies to pinpoint RNA’s cellular locations can add spatial detail to in situ transcriptomics.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#102

 

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Description Researchers from the University of Zurich interested in the effects of psychedelic drugs and meditation on brain regions involved in self-awareness have recently conducted a randomised, double-blind study – published in the journal NeuroImage – to find out what happens in the brain when the aforesai

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#103

 

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Description A MYSTERIOUS new type of pollution is washing up on Britain's beaches. Chunks of grey, rounded plastic resembling pebbles are littering the Cornish coast, and could be hiding in plain sight along beaches all over the world.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#104

 

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Description State and federal health officials are investigating almost 100 cases of mysterious lung illnesses linked to vaping and e-cigarette use in 14 states, many of them involving teens and young adults.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#105

 

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Description A component in cannabis called CBD is claimed to help everything from Alzheimer's to anxiety. Despite a boom in sales, there's little evidence supporting the claims

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 19 August 2019

#106

 

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Description New research has traced the history of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance back some 350-500 million years, a study in deep microorganism genealogy that could help in our current battle to contain the rise of superbugs.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#107

 

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Description SIR Terence English said his protege from the UK's first successful heart transplant in 1979 will first try to replace a human kidney with a pig's this year. And the pioneer believes this could pave the way for more complicated animal-human organ transplants - a process called 'xenotransplantation'.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#108

 

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Description Facebook’s content moderators say a higher-up asked company-appointed counsellors to share their confidential information.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#109

 

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Description Perfectionism is a hidden epidemic, and its rise is damaging individuals and society. We investigate how to escape the cult of perfect

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#110

 

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Description Reluctant to pop a paracetamol for that headache? Virtual reality might offer an alternative solution.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#111

 

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Description The number of people afflicted and hospitalised with serious lung disease connected to vaping continues to grow.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#112

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#113

 

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Name
Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#114

 

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Description The Seraph 100 Microbind Affinity Blood Filter from ExThera can treat a blood infection before the pathogen has been identified.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#115

 

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Description Patients can pay hundreds to thousands of dollars to screen for genetic health risks

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 18 August 2019

#116

 

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Description Genetic studies rebut current warnings from health officials that alcohol causes breast tumours, and that even light drinking causes throat cancer

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 17 August 2019

#117

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 17 August 2019

#118

 

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Description When the rest of the world was busy decoding genomic sequences one nucleotide at a time, the Human Genome Project and the X-PRIZE competition inspired the development of a shotgun-based DNA sequencing technique in 2005. Known as the Next-generation sequencing or NGS technique, this method is capable

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 17 August 2019

#119

 

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Description Give your biggest and most essential muscles some much deserved love

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 17 August 2019

#120

 

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Description The vaccine for human papilloma virus (HPV) is a feat of modern medicine that has proved to be both&nbsp;perfectly safe and highly effective.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 17 August 2019

#121

 

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Description A renegade star exploding in a distant galaxy has forced astronomers to set aside decades of research and focus on a new breed of supernova that can utterly annihilate its parent star — leaving no remnant behind. The signature event, something astronomers had never witnessed before, may represent th

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#122

 

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Description Black Hat information security conference attendees may have been exposed to measles.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#123

 

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Description A research group in Japan has created hybrid antibodies that can bind to and label specific targets in living cells.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#124

 

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Description The antibiotic could help tackle extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, which kills tens of thousands each year.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#125

 

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Description This awesome one-week sale sees prices slashed on a whole load of Philips products

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#126

 

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Description Sepsis occurs when the body goes overboard in its attempt to fight off an infection. Immune cells rush in, overreact and wreak havoc on tissues and organs, often resulting in organ failure and death. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine recently found that removing

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#127

 

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Description Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The research team devised

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#128

 

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Description A new model developed at MIT can help predict if patients at risk for Alzheimer’s disease will experience clinically significant cognitive decline due to the disease, by predicting their cognition test scores up to two years in the future. The model could be used to improve the selection of candi

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#129

 

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Description Brain cells, or neurons, constantly tinker with their circuit connections, a crucial feature that allows the brain to store and process information. While neurons frequently test out new potential partners through transient contacts, only a fraction of fledging junctions, called synapses, are select

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#130

 

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Description New research reveals how increasing brain stiffness as we age causes brain stem cell dysfunction, and demonstrates new ways to reverse older stem cells to a younger, healthier state. The results, published in Nature, have far-reaching implications for how we understand the ageing process, and how

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#131

 

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Description The microtubule-binding protein tau in neurons of the central nervous system can misfold into filamentous aggregates under certain conditions. These filaments are found in many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), and progressive supranuclea

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#132

 

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Description oosting a single molecule in the brain can change “dispositional anxiety,” the tendency to perceive many situations as threatening, in nonhuman primates, researchers from the University of California, Davis, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found. The molecule, neurotrophin-3, stimulates

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#133

 

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Description We receive half of our genes from each biological parent, so there’s no avoiding inheriting a blend of characteristics from both. Yet, for single-celled organisms like bacteria that reproduce by splitting into two identical cells, injecting variety into the gene pool isn’t so easy. Random mutations

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#134

 

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Description There’s no way around it – in the modern business world, companies need data from all areas of their business…...

#Medicine & Human body;#Aging
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#135

 

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Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#136

 

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Description Nerve cells in the brain that are tied to wakefulness are destroyed in people with Alzheimer’s, a finding that may refocus dementia research.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#137

 

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Description Leonardo da Vinci's "The Virgin of the Rocks" painting been under study since 2005. Improved X-ray technology has now highlighted the hidden angels. 

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#138

 

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Description A combination of heart cells derived from human stem cells could be the answer to developing a desperately-needed treatment for heart failure, according to new research by scientists at the University of Cambridge, published in Nature Biotechnology. Researchers have found that, by transplanting a

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#139

 

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Description When viewing objects within reach of our hands, specific areas in the brain become active. This is true in humans as well as in mice. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology have now identified a mouse brain region that appears to specialize in the perception of the nearby environmen

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#140

 

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Description Scientists have developed a probe that can rapidly detect reactive oxygen species, an early indicator of acute kidney failure.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#141

 

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Description The new drug manages to poison even stealth, non-replicating bacteria.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#142

 

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Description The proposed images may be challenged in court, but boy are they striking.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 16 August 2019

#143

 

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Description In recent years, MIT scientists have developed a new model for how key genes are controlled that suggests the cellular machinery that transcribes DNA into RNA forms specialized droplets called condensates. These droplets occur only at certain sites on the genome, helping to determine which genes are

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#144

 

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Description Software marketers spend lots of time and energy finding potential customers, driving them to their sites and encouraging them to…...

#Medicine & Human body;#Aging
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#145

 

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Description A previously unrecognized form of chemical bonding could explain why amyloid beta proteins clump up to cause Alzheimer’s disease.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#146

 

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Description The Tumaini app relies on deep learning and image recognition to help banana farmers spot the early signs of disease and pests.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#147

 

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Description A vaccine for the most commonly reported sexually transmitted infection is now a substantial step closer to reality.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#148

 

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Description A clinical trial for a vaccine against the sexually transmitted disease found that the product provoked an immune response.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#149

 

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Description Vessels at the base of the skull are important for draining waste from the brain and could be involved in age-related neurodegeneration, study says.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#150

 

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Description A healing hydrogel inspired by biofilms can be applied inside the body to help heal internal wounds.

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#151

 

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Description Immune cells may help painful gallstones grow by ejecting sticky nets of DNA around the crystals that form in bile – a finding that could lead to new treatments

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#152

 

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Description The first woman to qualify as a surgeon in the UK, Louisa Aldrich-Blake also helped to establish hospitals for soldiers in the First World War

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#153

 

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Description Beta-amyloid plaques, the protein aggregates that form in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, disrupt many brain functions and can kill neurons. They can also damage the blood-brain barrier — the normally tight border that prevents harmful molecules in the bloodstream from entering the brain. MIT

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#154

 

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Description A large international study led by McMaster shows that women with low-risk pregnancies who intend to give birth at home have no increased chance of the baby’s perinatal or neonatal death compared to low-risk women who intend to give birth in a hospital. The results have been published by The Lancet

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#155

 

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Description Collins has led the National Institutes of Health with a firm hand

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#156

 

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Name
Description An Ebola vaccine (rVSV-ZEBOV-GP Ebola vaccine) tested in Africa is 97.5% effective. Only 8.8% (60/679) of the vaccinated rings reported Ebola cases, and only 2.2% (15/679) reported Ebola cases 10 days or more after vaccination.The majority of cases among vaccinated people (76%, 54/71) occurred among high-risk contacts. Only 2 out of 68,279 vaccinated contacts of contacts developed Ebola. This indicates that the ring vaccination has an effect in preventing tertiary generation of cases. The estimated Ebola attack rate for vaccinated individuals was about 0.017%, compared with an estimated 0.656 %in unvaccinated individuals....

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#157

 

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Name
Description After more than fifty years of trying, a potential new chlamydia vaccine has at last reached phase 1 clinical trials. Not only was the vaccine found to be safe and well-tolerated when administered to humans, it was also able to provoke a distinct i

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#158

 

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Name
Description An analysis of hospital records has found that people with Lyme disease in hospitals in England and Wales tend to be white, female and relatively affluent

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#159

 

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Name
Description TBD

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019

#160

 

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Name
Description In the first of two meetings, an international commission discussed the criteria required before such experiments should be conducted&mdash;if ever

#Medicine & Human body
Field # Medicine & Human body
Updated 15 August 2019